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Blog posts tagged with 'Pregnancy Childbirth and the Newborn'

Library Journal Review

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the NewbornPregnancy, Childbiirth, and the Newborn was reviewed in last month's Libary Journal.

“VERDICT: Readers considering having a baby or who are already pregnant will find this a valuable resource. - Barbara Lundanis, Longmont Public Library, Colorado”

Available from these retailers

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Breastfeeding Issues

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et al.

Breastfeeding: Signs Your Baby Isn’t Getting Enough Breastmilk

When your baby doesn’t get enough of your milk, her risk of dehydration or problems with weight gain increase. If you observe any of these signs, schedule an appointment with your baby’s caregiver to have your baby assessed and weighed:

  • Your baby feeds fewer than eight times in twenty-four hours.
  • After your milk comes in, she doesn’t produce at least one poopy diaper in twenty-four hours.
  • She has few wet diapers or produces urine that appears to have reddish “brick dust” in it.
  • Your baby seems constantly hungry and is seldom content after feedings.
  • Your baby’s feedings worry or concern you.

Some signs are more serious than others. If you notice any of the following signs, call your baby’s caregiver immediately:

  • Your baby is lethargic and has no interest in nursing.
  • The inside of her mouth doesn’t glisten with moisture. (A baby’s lips can appear dry normally).
  • When you gently pinch the skin on her arm, leg, or abdomen and then let go, her skin stays “tented.”
  • Her eyes, face, chest, and abdomen are yellow. (See page 416 for more on jaundice symptoms.)

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide

© copyright Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

Big Changes in Maternity Care


Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn coauthor, Janelle Durham, details some of the major changes, chapter by chapter, in the latest edition of the best-selling guide in her Transition to Parenthood blog

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Parent's Corner Article

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

This month's Parent's Corner interviewed Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn author, Janelle Durham, on moving from the breast to bottle feeding in "How to Manage Your Baby’s Transitional Milestones (Part II)"

Available from these retailers

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Be sure to check out the new PCNGuide.com for extra information, resources, and worksheets directly related to topics within the book Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn.

First Time Parent Magazine Article

First Time Parent Magazine

This month's First Time Parent Magazine features an excerpt on "Seeding & Feeding the Microbiome" from the new Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn.

Recent research shows that the microbiome (the collection of bacteria, viruses, and other organisms that live in or on our bodies) has a significant impact on our immune systems, digestion, and more. The 5th edition discusses how to build a healthy microbiome during pregnancy and postpartum, and also how to help seed the baby’s microbiome, which is especially important if the baby has antibiotics, is delivered by cesarean, or is formula fed.

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn
is available from these retailers
Amazon.com Barnes&Noble BN.com BAM! Books-a-Million IndieBound

Book Review

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

Find out why Talk Birth calls Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: 

"an ideal companion for both childbirth professionals
and expectant parents."
-Molly Remer, Talk Birth

Available from these retailers
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Now Available

Pregnancy Childbirth and the Newborn

“Throw away your ‘what to expect’ guide! This book is what every mom-to-be needs.”
—Marjorie Greenfield, MD; author of The Working Woman’s Pregnancy Book

“Current research, wisdom, and women’s voices together create the most comprehensive book on understanding your options. It will educate, inspire, and nurture you to make informed decisions as you welcome your baby into the world.”
—Debra Pascali-Bonaro, LCCE, CD (DONA), PCD (DONA); coauthor of Orgasmic Birth: Your Guide to a Safe, Satisfying and Pleasurable Birth Experience; director of Orgasmic Birth: The Best-Kept Secret

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide by Penny Simkin, PT; Janet Whalley, RN, IBCLC; Ann Keppler, RN, MN; Janelle Durham, MSW, ICCE, LCCE; and April Bolding, PT, DPT, CD, CCE is already one of the bestselling pregnancy books on the market, with more than 1,400,000 copies sold! Now completely updated, this award- winning* guide provides expectant couples with valuable information to help make informed choices about pregnancy, birth, the postpartum period, and newborn care.

Notable updates to the new, 5th edition of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn include:

1. Cesarean prevention and related changes: Significant medical recommendations were recently released to reduce the number of cesarean births. The recommendations will have a sweeping impact on maternity care, and have necessitated many revisions and updates in the 5th edition. Affected topics include: when and why inductions are done, the definition of how long normal labor “should” take, and when intervention for prolonged labor is needed. The recommendations have also motivated caregivers to try a variety of alternatives before approving a cesarean delivery and have even affected how fetal heart rates are interpreted.

2. Pregnancy: Updates include an expanded discussion of advanced maternal age, obesity, gestational diabetes, and gestational hypertension—all of which are becoming more common. The 5th edition includes current guidelines for each of these topics and updated information on new options for screening for birth defects.

3. Induction: The 5th edition incorporates new information about elective inductions (those done for no medical reason) have become much less common due to new recommendations on the importance of letting babies determine the timing of their birth. Elective inductions, if done, should only be done after 39 weeks.

4. Inclusivity: Although previous editions have included “nontraditional” families and used gender-neutral language about the partner, the 5th edition uses gender-neutral language for the pregnant parent and includes resources for transgender and gender-queer parents.

5. Baby care: Although previous editions have always provided excellent coverage on health and medical care for newborns, the 5th edition contains more content on practical issues, such as holding, bathing, and dressing a newborn.

6. Breastfeeding: One large feeding chapter has now been divided into two chapters. The first addresses breastfeeding, feeding expressed breast milk, and formula feeding. The second addresses challenges and complications that can arise with breastfeeding. This change was made in response to comments from readers who reported that all the potential complications presented together with the basics of feeding raised their anxiety. Now readers concerned about feeding basics can get that information quickly and easily. If readers want more detailed information, they can find it in a separate chapter.

7. Insurance: With the Affordable Care Act, there are important changes in health-care benefits, which the 5th edition addresses.

8. Pain Medications and Comfort Techniques: Updated details on pain-medication options include combined spinal-epidural, which is starting to become more common. Also updated is the research on the effectiveness of nondrug pain coping techniques, which includes the concept of counterirritation—an effective method in which the laboring mother creates some controlled discomfort (such as squeezing a comb into her palms) to distract herself from labor pain.

9. Microbiome: Recent research shows that the microbiome (the collection of bacteria, viruses, and other organisms that live in or on our bodies) has a significant impact on our immune systems, digestion, and more. The 5th edition discusses how to build a healthy microbiome during pregnancy and postpartum, and also how to help seed the baby’s microbiome, which is especially important if the baby has antibiotics, is delivered by cesarean, or is formula fed.

10. Nutrition and Fitness: Updated nutrition guidelines to help parents make healthy food choices include a new section on increasing Vitamin D. Also included are guidelines for prenatal exercise, making notable changes to previous recommendations for pelvic floor exercises. Now that some states have legalized the use of marijuana, a section has been added discussing the risks of use.

11. Environmental Safety: The 5th edition includes updated information to make parents more aware of environmental safety issues, such as: EMF, PBA, phthalates, and glyphosate.

Readers can also find additional maternity care information at PCNGuide.com, as well as helpful forms and worksheets.


Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn is available in stores and online.

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

ISBN:978-1-501-11270-6
Paperback, 512 pages
Cover price: $19.99 

Penny Simkin, a physical therapist who has been a childbirth educator and doula since 1968, trains childbirth educators, doulas, and doula-trainers and frequently conducts workshops for doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals.

Janet Whalley, a registered nurse and lactation consultant, has been a childbirth educator since 1975.

Ann Keppler, a registered nurse, parish nurse, and lactation specialist, has taught childbirth classes and new-parent classes since 1975.

Janelle Durham, a social worker who has worked with new parents since 1993, is a birth doula, childbirth educator, and lactation educator.

April Bolding has a doctorate in physical therapy and is a childbirth educator, birth doula, water fitness instructor, and author.

*Mom’s Choice Awards Gold Award Winner, iParenting Media Awards Best Products Winner, Mom’s Choice Awards Gold Award Winner, Living Now Book Awards Bronze Award Winner, National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Gold Award Winner, USABookNews.com Best Books Award Winner, ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Awards Finalist

PCNGuide.com

PCNGuide.com

PCNGuide.com, the companion website to Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn, has been completed redesigned and updated to coincide with new edition of the bestselling pregnancy book!

Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn (softcover, $19.99, on-sale March 29, 2016) by Penny Simkin, PT; Janet Whalley, RN, IBCLC; Ann Keppler, RN, MN; Janelle Durham, MSW, ICCE, LCCE; and April Bolding, PT, DPT, CD, CCE is one of the most trusted pregnancy guides on the market, with more than 1,400,000 copies sold! Now completely updated, this award-winning* guide provides expectant couples with valuable information to help make informed choices about pregnancy, birth, the postpartum period, and newborn care.

PCNGuide.com supplements the book with:

  • Helpful forms, worksheets, and checklists directly related to book topics
  • Recommended readings, links, and resources
  • Additional information and guidelines that expand on book chapters
  • All available in a convenient PDF format and organized by pregnancy stages

The new, 5th edition of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn presents the most up-to-date and research- based information, including; cesarean prevention, childbirth for women over forty, gestational diabetes, recommended weight gain, hypertension, elective inductions, practical baby care, breastfeeding information and challenges, pain medications, building a healthy microbiome, and the latest nutrition and fitness guidelines.

“Women can only make informed choices when they’re able to get comprehensive information on the many decisions that come up during pregnancy, labor, birth, and the postpartum period. This book provides such information. I heartily recommend it to all pregnant women!”
—Ina May Gaskin, author of Ina May’s guide to Childbirth, Ina May’s guide to Breastfeeding, and Spiritual Midwifery

Tummy Time

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et al.

Switch Up Your Baby’s Awake Body Positions

Because babies need to sleep on their backs and spend time in car sweats and swings, the back of their heads can become flattened from contact with a firm surface. To prevent your baby from developing a misshapen head and to give her an opportunity to lift her head and strengthen her neck muscles, frequently place her on her tummy when she’s awake for as long as she’s happy in that position. Also limit the amount of time your baby spends in car seats and other baby equipment that put pressure on the back of her head. Many babies fuss when they’re fist learning to lie on their tummies. Over time, they’ll tolerate tummy time and eventually will begin to enjoy longer sessions. Here are ways provide supervised tummy time:

  • Lay your baby across your lap.
  • Lay your baby on the floor with a nursing pillow supporting her chest.
  • Lay your baby on an exercise ball, hold her steady, and roll the ball gently forward and back.
  • Hold baby tummy-side-down while practicing postpartum exercises.

In addition, holding your baby uptight in your arms or in a baby carrier (such as a Moby Wrap or ERGObaby carrier) will provide tummy-time benefits. 

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide

© copyright Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

How to Help a Breastfeeding Mom

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et al.

Q: My wife is exclusively breastfeeding our son. Is there anything I can do to help?

A: A father, partner, or other person provides a breastfeeding mom with extra pairs of eyes, ears, and hands. Sometimes a mom has trouble seeing if the baby is latching onto the breast well. You can help check the latch. As your baby latches onto the breast, you can hold his hands out of the way until he has latched on. You can also help evaluate how much milk your baby consumes by watching for rhythmic jaw movements and periodic pauses, and listening for swallowing noises that sound like “huh.”

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide, Fourth Edition

© copyright Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

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