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Blog posts tagged with 'Janet Whalley'

Q & A: How to Have a Smoke-free Pregnancy

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et al

Q: I know I shouldn’t smoke during pregnancy, but what can I do to quit?

A: Ask your caregiver for information about quitting. He or she may also provide a list of local smoking cessation programs. In addition, you can visit http://www.cancer.org for helpful tips, as well as other web sites of organizations that help people stop smoking. One thing not to do is use smoking substitutes (nicotine patch, gum, or nasal spray) during the first trimester. They can increase the risk of malformations in your baby if used when his organs and structures are forming.

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide, Fourth Edition

© copyright 2010 by Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

Q & A: How to Avoid Miscarriage

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et a

Q: My last pregnancy ended in a miscarriage. What can I do to increase my chances of carrying my next baby to term?

A: To improve your chances of a healthy pregnancy after a previous miscarriage, try to do the following:
• Have a well-balanced diet.
• Take prenatal vitamins.
• Avoid environmental toxins and infections.
• Don’t smoke or use recreational drugs.
• Avoid extremely stressful relationships as much as possible before and during pregnancy.
• Make arrangements for emotional support and medical monitoring, starting early in pregnancy.

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide, Fourth Edition

© copyright 2010 by Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

How To Relieve Severe Back Pain During Pregnancy

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et a

If you have severe back pain, ask your caregiver to refer you to a physical therapist or chiropractor who specializes in perinatal issues. This expert can provide treatment that may include ice packs, heat, hydrotherapy, massage, techniques to mobilize joints, and an exercise regimen designed to address your specific problem. Your caregiver may recommend that you wear a special garment or belt to support your abdomen and lower back.

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide, Fourth Edition

© copyright 2010 by Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

Beat the Baby Blues this Winter

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et a

Caring for a newborn is challenging, especially when the weather keeps you cooped up inside. The occasional stroll outside can calm both you and your baby, making the transition easier. When the weather prohibits the occasional walk outside, a visit to a friend’s house or even a trip to the mall, the hours inside with a baby can feel like weeks.

“Baby Blues" affects about 80 percent of all new mothers. Symptoms can include crying easily, feeling overwhelmed, feeling a loss of control, feeling exhausted, anxious or sad, and feeling a lack of confidence about being a parent.

Try these suggestions for ways to ease the baby blues when you can’t get outside:
•    Eating well
•    Avoiding alcohol, caffeine and over-the-counter sleep medications
•    Getting regular exercise such as walking on a treadmill
•    Being in sunlight or its equivalent long enough to make you feel good
•    Having time for yourself with a break from responsibility
•    Getting adequate rest and sleep

These tips can help make the time you spend with your newborn this winter not only bearable, but also enjoyable.

© copyright 2010 by Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

Are Non-medical Uses of Ultrasound Completely Safe?

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et al.

Fact or Fiction? Non-medical uses of ultrasound, such as at-home Doppler heartbeat monitors and ultrasound videos or photos, are completely safe.

Fiction. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine acknowledge that ultrasound poses no known risks to babies, it can affect the body and the long-term effects of extensive exposure are also unknown. To be safe, health care experts recommend that ultrasound be performed only by a trained provider and only when medically indicated.

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide, Fourth Edition

© copyright 2010 by Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

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