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Blog posts tagged with 'Giggle Poetry'

"Santa Got Stuck in the Chimney"

Santa Got Stuck in the Chimney by Kenn Nesbitt

© copyright Kenn Nesbitt with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

A Bad Case of Sneezes

A Bad Case of Sneezes by Bruce LanskyLast night I had the sneezes.
I was really very ill.
My mother called the doctor
who prescribed a purple pill.

At eight o’clock I went to bed.
My mom turned out the light.
I used up one whole box of Kleenex
sneezing through the night.

I sneezed my brains out in my bed.
I didn’t get much rest.
So that’s the reason, teacher,
that I flunked the spelling test.

Text © Bruce Lansky with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press. Illustration © Stephen Carpenter.

Short Metaphorical Poems

Giggle Poetry

by Bruce Lansky

Most of my school visits include 4 or 5 writing workshops—usually with 3rd, 4th and 5th grade students. And since we usually write 3 to 6 poems in each of those sessions,
I wind up creating about 10 to 20 poems on every full-day school visit. Recently I have begun to include free-verse poems in the mix. This allows us to focus on ideas and words—without having to worry about rhythm and rhyme. I started experimenting with a new “genre” I invented called “Short Metaphorical Poems.” These poems usually involve a comparison between two things or ideas. Sometimes they use metaphors (e.g., “My Mother is My Alarm Clock”), sometimes they use similes (e.g., “The Moon is Like a Light Bulb”) and sometimes they use comparisons (e.g., “How to Tell if the Critter Who Sleeps in Your Bed is a Dog or Cat”).

When I write metrical poems with students, I usually spend about 2/3 of the time explaining and demonstrating where the rhyming words go, the difference between “true rhymes” (in which both the vowels and consonants rhyme—like nap and cap) and “near rhymes” (in which only the vowels rhyme—like nap and hat), the need for a consistent rhyme pattern, how to count “beats,” the difference between “beats” and “syllables” (usually there are two or three or four beats in each line and two or three times as many syllables), and the need for a consistent rhythm pattern.

I thought you might find it interesting to share a recent free-verse comparative poem I wrote with students I recently visited in Dallas and Wichita. I got the idea in a 5th grade workshop in McKinney, TX. While working on “The Moon is Like a Light Bulb,” a clever student suggested that because the moon reflects light from the sun, it is more like a mirror than a light bulb. At the end of the session, I asked the students to think about other comparisons they might want to write about. One suggested a comparison between dogs and cats.

I worked on that suggestion with other 5th grade students in McKinney, TX and with 4th and 5th grade students in Andover, KS. The students seemed to love the concept and couldn’t stop thinking about experiments that would demonstrate the difference. The challenge of writing a quasi-scientific, humorous poem about the difference between cats and dogs kept students’ hands up throughout the workshops.

(I should probably mention that students in my writing workshops usually spend more time revising lines of poetry we’ve just written than writing new lines of poetry. Often they would rather rewrite, or fix, the line of poetry we’ve just written than start work on the next new line of poetry. I think this may be one of the biggest lessons they learn: That rewriting poetry is as important and fun as writing down a fresh idea.

Maybe it was the fun of writing non-metrical poems; maybe it was the plunge into scientific thinking—but whatever it was, the students were fascinated*. After I got home I decided to fine-tune the poem for presentation on my Giggle Poetry Facebook page. Below is my second rewrite on the dog/cat comparison theme. You might want to show it to your children or students to see what other experiments they can come up with.

How to Tell If the Critter Who Sleeps On Your Bed is a Dog or Cat

Call the critter. If it runs to you and wants you to pet it, it’s a dog. If it looks at you as if you are crazy, it’s a cat.

Throw a tennis ball across the yard and say, “Fetch!” If the critter chases it, brings it back to you—all wet and gooey—and then wags its tail happily, it’s a dog. If the critter walks after the ball, sniffs it, and then walks away, it’s a cat.

Take your critter to the lake, then run into the water and yell, “Come!” If the critter follows you into the water it’s a dog. If the critter won’t go near the water, it’s a cat.

On the fourth of July, bring your critter to the parade. When the fire truck drives by, if the critter chases after it barking loudly, it’s a dog. If the critter runs home and hides under your bed, it’s a cat.

Pick the critter up and throw it onto your bed. If it lands safely on its feet, it’s a cat. If it crash lands on its back it’s a dog.

Now that you know if your critter is a cat or a dog, take good care of it so your parents don’t get so tired of feeding it they threaten to donate it to Goodwill.

Vampire Brat

Vampire Brat

On the night he was bit by a vampire bat,
my brother turned into a vampire brat.
He used to be someone I tried to ignore,
but now he’s obnoxious like never before. 

He brushes his teeth, then he sharpens his fangs.
He sweeps back his hair to get rid of his bangs.
He swoops through the room, and he messes my hair.
He’s weird. I mean, look how he dresses, I swear. 

He says I’ve got zits, such an ugly complexion,
but look in the mirror—he’s got no reflection.
At dinner he makes me feel very uptight
when he raises his eyebrows and asks for a “bite.”

He stays up all night watching movies and junk,
then he sleeps upside down from the top of his bunk.
My friends won’t come over. My life is a wreck.
Let’s face it, my brother’s a pain in the neck. 

Text © Neal Levin with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press. Illustration © Mike & Carl Gordon. Any copying or use of this poem or illustration without consent is unlawful.

"Welcome Back to School"

Welcome Back to School by Kenn Nesbitt“Dear students, the summer has ended.
The school year at last has begun.
But this year is totally different.
I promise we’ll only have fun.

“We won’t study any mathematics,
and recess will last all day long.
Instead of the Pledge of Allegiance,
we’ll belt out a rock ’n’ roll song.

“We’ll only play games in the classroom.
You’re welcome to bring in your toys.
It’s okay to run in the hallways.
It’s great if you make lots of noise.

“Your video games are your homework.
You’ll have to watch lots of TV.
For field trips we’ll go to the movies
and get lots of candy for free.

“The lunchroom will only serve chocolate
and Triple-Fudge Sundaes Supreme.”
Yes, that’s what I heard from my teacher
before I woke up from my dream.

Text © Kenn Nesbitt reprinted from Revenge of the Lunch Ladies, published by Meadowbrook Press.
Illustration © Mike & Carl Gordon.
Any copying or use of this poem or illustration without consent is unlawful.

If I Ran the School

If I Ran the School

Jenna at Musings from the Middle School made up a great lesson plan for If I Ran the School.  You can download her instructions here!

If I Ran the School is available as an eBook at the following:

Amazon  iTunes  Barnes&Noble  Google   

Poetry Olio Videos

Bruce Lansky performed some of his crowd-pleasing poems at this year's Poetry Olio!

I Love Summer--Except...

I Love SummerI love all the fun
that summertime brings—
excepting, of course
just one or two things:
Except for the ticks
and spiders and bees.
Except for the pollen
from grasses and trees.
Except for the sunburn
and rashes from heat,
and sidewalks so hot
they burn up your feet.
Except for sour grapes
and melons with seeds,
and slithery snakes
that hide in the weeds.
Except for mosquitoes
that suck on your skin,
and all of the flies
that let themselves in.
Except for the warm nights
when I sleep in a cot.
Except for the weather
that’s humid and hot.
Except for the smog,
the dust, and the grime…
But other than that,
I love summertime.

© Janice Kuharski reprinted from Rolling in the Aisles, published by Meadowbrook Press. Illustration © Stephen Carpenter.

19th Annual Poetry Olio

2016 Poetry Olio

And don't forget to stop by Bruce Lansky's booth for autographs and fun! 

He'll be at booth #2500 at the International Literacy Association 61th Annual Conference 
July 9-11 at Hynes Convention Center in Boston, MA.

We hope to see you there!

"I Wrote a Book"

I Wrote a Book by Robert Pottle

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