RSS

Blog posts of '2013' 'November'

Have some books for dessert!

turkey20

Enter code "turkey20" at checkout for 20% off your order now through December 2, 2013.

Free shipping on all orders over $25.

Handprint Menorah

Picture of The Toddler's Busy Book

by Trish Kuffner

What you'll need:

White, yellow, and orange tempera paint
Blue construction paper

Directions:

Paint the palms of your child’s hands white (the candleholder), his fingers yellow (the candles), and the tips of his fingers orange (the flames). Cross his hands over and press them onto the blue construction paper (his thumbs will be on opposite ends of the paper). Make sure his pinky fingers overlap and print as one finger, so the total number of imprints is nine. You could fold the construction paper in half before printing and use it for a Hanukkah card, or cover it with clear contact paper for a Hanukkah place mat.

*Note: Most one-year-olds will not sit still long enough for this activity, but most two- and three-year-olds will enjoy it.

© copyright Trish Kuffner from The Toddler's Busy Book with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

"Allergic"

A sick poem by Robert Pottle

Allergic

© copyright Robert Pottle from I'm Allergic to School with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

Free Giveaway Final Days
Turkey Treats

Picture of The Children's Busy Book

by Trish Kuffner

What you'll need:

One 15-ounce package prepared piecrusts
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cinnamon
Turkey-shaped cookie cutter

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 450ºF. Unfold the piecrusts on wax paper. Let your child cut shapes from the pastry with the cookie cutter. Mix the sugar and cinnamon and sprinkle the mixture over the shapes. Transfer them to an ungreased baking sheet and bake them for 8–10 minutes. Remove them from the baking sheet and let them cool on a wire rack.

This recipe makes about 16 turkey treats.

© copyright Trish Kuffner from The Children's Busy Book with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

Do the Chances of Conceiving Multiples Run in Families?

Picture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn

by Penny Simkin, PT; et al.

Fact or Fiction? The only chance a woman has of conceiving multiples is if multiples run in her family or the baby’s father’s family.

Fiction. A woman also increases the likelihood of becoming pregnant with multiples if she:

• Is large and tall.

• Is older than thirty-five.

• Is Caucasian or African-American. (Multiples are less common in Asian and Hispanic women.)

• Had at least one other pregnancy.

• Used fertility drugs that increase the number of eggs released during ovulation.

• Had more than one egg implanted during procedures, such as in vitro fertilization.

Most of these factors affect only the rate of fraternal twins, triplets, or higher-order multiples, because the occurrence of identical siblings is an unpredictable and random event.

Excerpted from: Pregnancy, Childbirth and the Newborn: The Complete Guide, Fourth Edition

© copyright 2010 by Parent Trust for Washington Children with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

“Can You Solve the Mystery?” Free Giveaway!
Weather Walk

A creative exercise activity by Trish Kuffner

Weather Walk

 

© copyright 2013 Trish Kuffner from The Fitness Fun Busy Book with permission of its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

"I'm not drunk!"

I'm not drunk

© copyright 2013 by David Tarradas Agea from Spanish Without Words with permission from its publisher Meadowbrook Press.

The Case of the Furious Fire

A Two-Minute Mystery from the Can You Solve the Mystery? series created by Bruce Lansky

The Case of the Furious Fire

Click here for the answer!

 

© copyright 2013 from the Can You Solve the Mystery? series with permission of its publisher, Meadowbrook Press.

Signup to receive
news, specials & more!